Round River Alumni Photo Contest

Alumni, send us your best shots! As a student on our program, you have the opportunity to experience vast, wild places, encounter wildlife, and interact with the local people. In our first official Photo Contest, we would like to see your best photos – those that capture the spirit of a Round River program, as well as the…

Species Profile: Moss Campion

By Drew Higgins (Carleton College) Moss Campion (Silene acaulis) Moss-like mats Occurs in rocky, alpine environments Silene acaulis Salverform flowers (composed of united petals forming a tube that spreads at the open end) Cushion of moss (also called “cushion pink”) Aromatic flowers like lilac Moist but well-drained areas Pink, lilac, or purple flowers Inserts long woody…

Species Profile: Porcupine

By Sawyer Hill (Westminster College)   The Perpetually Plodding Porcupine   This large rodent of the Erethizontidae Family, plods through forest, shrublands, and tundra so purposefully.   The “quill pig” also known as Erethizon dorsatum is covered in thousands of quills and then some.   The quills of these slow moving, near-sighted herbivores can be…

Last Days of an Atlin Summer

By Hannah Eiseman (University of Vermont ’14)   Flipping back through the yellow books we all use to take notes in the field, it’s impressive to see the amount of ground we have covered, and the experiences that we have all had this summer. From the hikes we have done, to the fieldwork we’ve conducted…

Tlatsini Culture Camp

By Kaitlyn Miller (Macalester College)   A few days ago our whole crew headed out to McDonald Lake to help set up and then participate in the Taku River Tlingit culture camp. When we first arrived it was pouring rain, but we were able to set up a large tent to protect food and supplies…

Roads to Wilderness

By Sylvia Kinosian (University of Vermont)   A big part of the reason I and many other people come to Atlin and participate in the Taku Watershed Conservation Program is to experience a vast and remote wilderness. Ironically, a large part of the traveling we have done this summer has been driving or walking on…

Grizzly country

By Nico Shaffer (Westminster College)   Grizzly bears have a long troubled past with humans in the lower 48. A stretch of country grizzlies once spanned in its entirety, they have now been maimed and relocated from all but a few of the most “wild” national parks. Substantial populations now only exist in two fragmented…